Industrial Skate Block Trackline System Upper Section (Part 1)

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Hi, I'm Richard Delaney from Rope Lab in the Blue Mountains of Australia, and I'm working today with the Rigging Lab Academy. Today we're working at Deschutes Brewery in Bend, Oregon.

We're going to continue with the skate blocks that we've been looking at in previous sessions, but this time we're working in an industrial context.

The other significant difference with what we've got, because we've got so many features with this industrial structure, rather than having a mirrored skate block, I've find for attention track line with a single skate block. It's because it's like threading a needle, getting the load up through the aperture that I've got opened just outside this gin pole.

A few other things that we'll bring in, the same consideration with the anchoring. We've used a V anchor. I've just tried to be very efficient with the rope that I've used in that anchor. I've started with one end at the far point, come up to my anchor focal point, back to another anchor point, and then bought that strand forwards because I've used the same rope. I've got enough free rope to use for the tension track line. This track line we'll see when we're downstairs. I can adjust the tension of that mid operation if I need because I've got a CMC MPD at the bottom end.

The skate block that I've got set up this time, we're going to be raising loads rather than lowering, so I'll be using this skyhook wench to do that work for me.

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Peace on your Days...

Lance

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About The Author:

Richard, the founder of RopeLab, aims to promote a better understanding of the fundamental principles underpinning the craft of the rope technician. He originally created RopeLab to build a greater understanding of the physics of roped systems. Seeing value in ideas being shared across industries, Richard looks at the physics of roped systems and equipment that may be used in a range of situations and industries. Climbers, rope technicians, riggers, slackliners, arborists and rescue operators all will find useful information here. Through the countless tests that he conducts to generate data that he can then apply to real working situations, his reports detail the methodology and results of each test conducted and he encourages critical assessment. Richard also delivers regular workshops which aim to facilitate learning in a social and practical environment. These workshops encourage critical thinking based in an understanding of fundamental principles rather than rote learning. Experience across a range of industries gives Richard the capacity to tailor workshops to specific environments.

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