Examples of Dangerous Petzl Carabiner Loading

Written By: Lance Piatt

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A carabiner is strongest when loaded on the major axis, with the gate closed and the sleeve locked. Loading a carabiner in any other way can be dangerous.

 

Load position

Barring exceptional circumstances, a carabiner is designed to be loaded on the major axis.

Only the strength rating for the major axis with the gate closed is suitable for the loads sustained by a carabiner in vertical activities.

 

Loading on any axis other than the major axis, and any poor positioning will result in reduced strength.


THE PRIMARY RISKS

Risk of unclipping

The gate can come open if:

  • The carabiner is not properly closed at the time of attachment (e.g. sling caught between the nose and the gate).
  • The carabiner was improperly closed or improperly locked before use and the rock, the rope or an item of equipment presses on the gate.
  • The rock, the rope, or an item of equipment rubs against and unlocks the sleeve, and pushes on the gate in the direction of opening.

 

 

 

 

 

BUY PETZL CARABINERS
Risk of carabiner breakage

Note: Vertical practices involving a single user who is properly equipped and protected from falls rarely generate enough force to break a carabiner. However, any fall can produce an impact force that approaches the breaking strength of a poorly positioned carabiner.

Examples of risk situations in the field
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Peace on your Days

Lance

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