CMC Arizona Vortex Series 3 of 4: Arizona Vortex Sideways A-Frames

Written By: Lance Piatt

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Arizona Vortex Sideways A-Frames

Depending on your edge conditions or the topography of the surface, you might not be able to use a traditional easel leg A-frame. In that case, the Vortex allows you to go to a sideways easel leg and that way you can work the Vortex into a narrower condition. Or maybe when things aren’t quite level. In some cases you can even do it where the easel leg is just horizontal to the surface and maybe up against the wall or a rock.

So now we have the sideways A-frame with the easel legs set up and ready to use. There’s a couple of key things that you have to think about that exist for all the Vortex configurations. When the pulley is loaded, the resultant is within the hobble straps. The forces are down in between the legs, which keeps the high directional stable. These two legs are in line between the load and the anchor. It’s a little hard to see right now, but it’ll make sense to you that these are in line, keeping the load, again, within the triangle of the tripod. The front leg is shorter than the back leg, which a little offsets the head. But the reason for that is to push the load closer to the edge to give us a maximum benefit of the high directional.

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Arizona Vortex Training

 

This back leg is in compression. This is just a safety line to make sure that nothing happens when we set it up. The load is going to hold itself separate and stable. Here, we’re going to the ground with our lazy leg, or with our easel leg. But if we had a very narrow opening, it would hinge up here at the head and it leg could go straight out up against a wall or on a rock or anything like that. So, it doesn’t need to be quite in this configuration, depending on what space you have.

Buy the CMC Arizona Vortex
Arizona Vortex Training

All right. This is another example showing the flexibility of the Arizona Vortex. Here we have rigged a guide sideways A-frame, where we have the A-frame built with the Vortex. Again, the front legs are short and vertical. The back leg is steaded, which distorts the head a little bit and makes it at an angle. We have these blue lines that are gawing it in either direction to keep it from tipping. Same rules, resultant from the pulley, comes right down between the legs, in line with the legs, and the load goes over the side.

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Peace on your Days

Lance

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